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Nutrient profiles and browning control of wasp larvae

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posted on 2024-06-13, 07:29 authored by K. Wang, H. Zhu, X. Chen, J. Qiao, G. Huang, E. Haubruge, J. Dong, H. Zhang

Entomophagy, the practice of consuming insects, has long been recognized as a sustainable and renewable source of food. This study aimed at assessing the nutritional value of three species of wasp larvae (Provespa barthelemyi, Vespa mandarinia, and V. velutina) and explore effective strategies to address enzymatic browning during processing. The study reveals that wasp larvae exhibit considerable potential as a dietary resource, primarily due to their high protein content, more than 50% of the total dry matter. Remarkably, the presence of vitamin B2 in wasp larvae was unexpectedly high, with an average concentration of 2.20 mg/100 g.Entomophagy, the practice of consuming insects, has long been recognized as a sustainable and renewable source of food. This study aimed at assessing the nutritional value of three species of wasp larvae (Provespa barthelemyi, Vespa mandarinia, and V. velutina) and explore effective strategies to address enzymatic browning during processing. The study reveals that wasp larvae exhibit considerable potential as a dietary resource, primarily due to their high protein content, more than 50% of the total dry matter. Remarkably, the presence of vitamin B2 in wasp larvae was unexpectedly high, with an average concentration of 2.20 mg/100 g. Additionally, enzymatic browning process in wasp larvae is closely associated with phenol oxidase (PO) activity. The simultaneous treatment of ascorbic acid at a concentration of 0.2% (w/v) and high hydrostatic pressure at 300 MPa significantly inhibited PO activity. Notably, the combined treatment exhibited a certain degree of efficacy in retaining the taste and texture of the larvae. To the best of our knowledge, this study pioneers the novel combined treatment aimed at mitigating browning in wasp larvae. Overall, our research reveals that wasp larvae boast a wealth of nutritional components, rendering them as a new resource food. Our research also provides an innovative approach for wasp processing.reatment exhibited a certain degree of efficacy in retaining the taste and texture of the larvae. To the best of our knowledge, this study pioneers the novel combined treatment aimed at mitigating browning in wasp larvae. Overall, our research reveals that wasp larvae boast a wealth of nutritional components, rendering them as a new resource food. Our research also provides an innovative approach for wasp processing.

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